My flirtations with a vegetarian lifestyle have had their ups and downs over the years.

I think I managed to live meat-free for about 6 months during my university years in the UK – but in all honesty that had more to do with my meagre finances and was secondary to any real environmental convictions.

And of course the eventual temptation back to beef and chicken – and particularly bacon – was always too great.

Call me weak-willed – but I just wish there was something like Quorn available at the time. Developed in the late 1980’s but only really commercially introduced in the early 2000’s, Quorn is a meat substitute with mycoprotein as it’s main ingredient. This is derived from the Fusarium venenatum fungus, which is grown by fermentation using a process similar to the production of beer or yoghurt.

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I vaguely remember it being introduced back then, and that it was really expensive too. I pretty much dismissed it as another meat-free fad, and well, life moved on.

So I was really surprised when Quorn was recently introduced to Singapore. Well I reckoned there had to be something to it for the product to still be around after all these years. So we ordered a couple of packets of it through redmart and tentatively waited to take a taste test!

Quorn is available in variety of shapes and actual meals, but we opted for their Crispy Nuggets and their Chicken and Leek Pies – which we were particularly curious about…

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And wow! Such a revelation! Not just in taste but also in texture, there’s hardly anything to differentiate between Quorn and cooked chicken. It worked really well in the creamy consistency of the pie filling, and the nuggets were just like, well, chicken nuggets.

When products like this are now so readily available, you wonder why its still so difficult for people to switch to a meat-free diet, or at least make a start at cutting down their meat consumption.

I’m not sure its feasible to eat Quorn products on a daily basis – they are still a bit pricey, starting at $5 per pack. But I’ve got to admit they are tasty and will definitely help us on our journey to meat-less eating… and who knows, maybe we’ll even try their Turkey-less Roast this Christmas!

To find out more about Quorn, visit their Facebook page.